News Briefs

July 22, 2021
The Hong Kong-registered firm China Concord Petroleum Co (CCPC) has obtained at least 14 oil tankers over the past year to transfer Iranian and Venezuelan petroleum to China, according to industry and official sources in China, Venezuela, and Iran. The tankers are together capable of holding about 28 million barrels of oil. CCPC provides Iranian petroleum to six independent Chinese refineries colloquially known as "teapots." Iranian officials described CCPC as a key interlocutor in Iran's export of oil to China, which averaged 557,000 barrels per day between November 2020 and March 2021. Iran's total crude oil exports were over 600,000 barrels per day in June 2021, according to a Reuters survey. In 2019, the United States sanctioned CCPC for violating U.S. sanctions on Iran's petroleum industry.
-- Reuters
July 22, 2021
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani announced that Iran had begun operations at a new oil terminal near the port of Jask in the Gulf of Oman by loading a 100-metric-ton shipment of petroleum there. The new terminal will enable Iranian tankers to bypass the Strait of Hormuz, a major chokepoint between the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Sea. Rouhani framed the new installation, which took about two years to build, as a way around a possible blockade in the event of armed conflict. According to Rouhani, Iran intends to export 1 million barrels of oil per day (bpd) from the site; the facility's present capacity is 350,000 bpd. The terminal is supplied by a 1,000-kilometer pipeline extending from the city of Goreh in Bushehr Province.
-- Al Jazeera
July 15, 2021
Facebook announced in a July 15 blog post that an Iranian hacker group had created fake profiles on the social media service to contact military personnel and defense contractors in the United States, the United Kingdom, and other European countries in a months-long bid to infect their computers with viruses and steal data. The hackers disguised themselves as journalists, corporate recruiters, employees of defense firms and nongovernmental organizations, and workers employed in the aviation, healthcare, and hospitality industries. According to Facebook, the hackers would try "to move conversations off-platform" through the use of other "collaboration and messaging platforms," then send malware to their targets. Facebook, which removed the fake profiles and blocked related domains, described the effort as part of a "much broader cross-platform cyber espionage operation" and linked the malware to Mahak Rayan Afraz, a Tehran-based firm tied to the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC). It remains unclear what information, if any, the hacker group—known as "Tortoiseshell"—succeeded in obtaining from its targets.
-- Voice of America
July 14, 2021
According to an unnamed diplomat, Iran told European officials that it was waiting until Iranian President-elect Ebrahim Raisi takes office to return to negotiations meant to bring Iran and the United States back into compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). The diplomat said that participants in the negotiations expect them to resume in mid-August; the last round of talks ended on June 20. The U.S. State Department confirmed that Iran had asked for more time to accommodate its presidential transition.
-- Reuters
July 6, 2021
The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reported on July 6 that Iran had started the process of producing uranium metal enriched to 20 percent purity at the Fuel Fabrication Plant in Isfahan. Iran claims that it plans to use the enriched uranium metal as fuel for a research reactor. France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States criticized the Iranian move as a threat to ongoing negotiations to return Iran to compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). The JCPOA prohibits Iran from performing any work related to uranium metal, which can be used in the core of a nuclear weapon. Iran produced a small quantity of unenriched uranium metal earlier this year.
-- Reuters
July 6, 2021
On July 6, Iran accused Israel of orchestrating a failed attempt late last month to sabotage a nuclear facility in the Iranian city of Karaj. Ali Rabiei, a spokesman for Iran's cabinet, said that the attack caused a hole in a building's ceiling and a "not remarkable" level of damage to equipment, contradicting earlier Iranian claims that the alleged sabotage had resulted in no casualties or damage. Rabiei added that Iranian authorities had removed the building's roof for repairs. He alleged that the Israeli operatives were trying to undermine ongoing negotiations in Vienna to restore the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).
-- Associated Press
July 5, 2021
Mahmud Jafari, the manager of the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) and deputy head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), said on July 5 that Iran had brought the BNPP back into operation a day earlier after fixing a fault in it its 1,000-megawatt reactor. Iran had shut down the BNPP, the country's only nuclear power plant, following the unspecified "technical fault" that the AEOI first mentioned publicly on June 20.
-- Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
July 3, 2021
The U.S. Treasury Department announced on July 2 that it was lifting sanctions on the Iranian nationals Behzad Ferdows, Mehrzad Ferdows, and Mohammad Reza Dezfulian, whom the Treasury Department had designated in September 2020 under an executive order aimed at proliferators of weapons of mass destruction and their supporters. According to the Treasury Department press release outlining the basis for the original designation, Behzad Ferdows and Mehrzad Ferdows held shares in Mammut Industries, a company alllegedly supporting Iran's development of ballistic missiles, and Dezfulian served as managing director of the Mammut Industries subsidiary Mammut Diesel. The Treasury Department denied any connection between the removal of the sanctions and ongoing negotiations over Iran's nuclear program in Vienna.
-- Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
July 1, 2021
Iran has limited the ability of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to inspect the country's primary uranium-enrichment facility in Natanz, according to Western diplomats. Iran justified the move as necessary to preserve security at Natanz after an alleged Israeli attack on the site in April. The IAEA has not reported the matter to its member states or convened an emergency meeting of its board of governors. Separately, a temporary agreement between Iran and the IAEA to preserve data from the Agency’s monitoring cameras at Iranian nuclear facilities expired last week. The IAEA said that Iran had not responded to inquiries about extending the arrangement.
-- Reuters
June 23, 2021
According to U.S. defense officials, the U.S. Defense Department monitored a failed attempt by Iran to launch a satellite on June 12. The officials said that they had yet to determine why and at what stage the launch failed. Analysts concluded that Iran likely used a two-stage Simorgh space launch vehicle, which employs engines based on North Korean designs. Meanwhile, commercial satellite images taken on June 20 show indications that Iran is making preparations for a second launch. Some analysts believe that Iran can repurpose technology from its space program for use in the development of intercontinental ballistic missiles.
-- CNN

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