Articles and Reports

Articles and Reports
May 1, 2002
In March, President Bush marked the six-month anniversary of September 11 by warning us once again of the peril posed by weapons of mass destruction. From the south lawn of the White House, he cautioned that "terrorist groups are hungry for these weapons, and would use them without a hint of conscience." The result, he said, would be "blackmail,...
Articles and Reports
May 5, 1999
Americans are right to be outraged that a suspected Chinese spy may have stolen the computer codes for the entire United States nuclear arsenal. But the loss of this data is only half the story. The other half is about hardware. Even after stealing the plan for an advanced warhead, one would need high-performance equipment to manufacture and test...
Articles and Reports
April 1, 1999
Since early this year, Washington has been in a state of shock over Chinese espionage -- especially the theft of information about one of America's most advanced nuclear warheads. China is also suspected of stealing the secrets of the U.S. neutron bomb and of penetrating other top secret U.S. military programs. As important as these strategic...
Articles and Reports
September 4, 1994
This summer, the German police are suddenly reporting a flood of nuclear smuggling cases. Small amounts of nuclear material have leaked out of the former Soviet Bloc since 1991, but these latest reports are unprecedented. For the first time, more than half a pound of weapon-useable plutonium turned up--confiscated August 10 in the Munich airport...
Articles and Reports
August 1, 1992
On June 16, 1992 the U.S. Department of Commerce published its long-awaited list of missile projects in the Third World. The list was supposed to plant a red flag on the heads of secret missile makers by naming them, and thus deny them U.S. exports. Instead, the administration came up short by bowing to special interests. U.S. law forbids U.S....
Articles and Reports
January 1, 1992
From September 1990 to September 1991, the U.S. Department of Commerce approved nearly $60 million dollars' worth of sensitive exports to Iran. Most of these items were "dual use," meaning that in addition to their civilian uses, they can be used to make nuclear weapons, long-range missiles or other military equipment. The record of these exports...
Articles and Reports
July 1, 1991
From 1986 to 1990, the U.S. Commerce Department approved over $300 million worth of sensitive American exports to Iran and Syria. Most of these were "dual-use" items, capable of making nuclear weapons or long-range missiles if diverted from their claimed civilian purposes. The record of these exports, complied from Commerce Department data, has...

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