Our Publications

Speeches and Testimony
May 20, 2008
For over a decade, we have seen a consistent push by industry to weaken U.S. controls on the export of militarily sensitive technologies. Though tasked with protecting U.S. national security, successive administrations have succumbed to the pressure to "modernize" export controls and to make them less "burdensome" and more "efficient." The result...
Speeches and Testimony
July 25, 2007
First, I should say that our best opportunity to stop, or at least slow down Iran's nuclear progress was in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when the Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan was supplying the foundation for Iran's present centrifuge program. Khan was a known nuclear smuggler, having stolen designs from Europe for a uranium enrichment plant in...
Speeches and Testimony
April 26, 2006
The Committee is right to emphasize the strategic nature of the plan. The legislation to implement it goes to the heart of our national security. The bill now before Congress would change our export control laws - laws that have been in effect for almost thirty years, and that were adopted in response to India's nuclear test in 1974. It is worth...
Speeches and Testimony
March 8, 2006
As the committee knows, the Iranian nuclear dispute has reached a turning point. Iran has rejected efforts by Britain, France and Germany to resolve things diplomatically. It has not accepted Russia's offer to shift Iran's nuclear enrichment work to Russian soil. And it has rejected repeated calls by these four countries, by China, and by the...
Speeches and Testimony
May 19, 2005
I will concentrate my remarks upon the present negotiations Iran is conducting with Britain, France and Germany. First, I would like to point out that the deal struck among these countries in November should be seen as a tactical step. It was intended to buy time, and to provide an opening for continued talks. It should not be seen as a answer to...
Speeches and Testimony
March 10, 2005
As the Commission well knows, China's exports continue to be a serious proliferation threat. Since 1980, China has supplied billions of dollars' worth of nuclear weapon, chemical weapon, and missile technology to South Asia and the Middle East. It has done so in the face of U.S. protests, and despite repeated promises to stop. The exports are...
Speeches and Testimony
October 16, 2003
In mid-September, the International Atomic Energy Agency gave Iran a deadline. By October 31, Iran is supposed to come clean about its nuclear program. Iran is supposed to explain the traces of highly enriched uranium found at the Natanz site, where Iran is building a plant to enrich uranium with centrifuges, and explain the traces of highly...
Speeches and Testimony
October 1, 2003
I have been asked to describe the world wide missile threat. The first point I would like to make is historical: long range missiles have been developed to carry nuclear weapons. They don't make sense for use with conventional weapons. A country is not going to spend the money to develop a 5,000-mile or 5,000-kilometer missile to knock down a...
Speeches and Testimony
September 17, 2003
I am pleased to appear before this joint committee to discuss Iran's nuclear program and Iran's imports of sensitive technology. I direct the Wisconsin Project on Nuclear Arms Control, a research organization here in Washington that is devoted to stopping the spread of mass destruction weapons. I will begin by describing the challenge posed by...
Speeches and Testimony
June 6, 2002
If we look around the world today, and ask ourselves what are the "pacing items" in the spread of mass destruction weapons, the answer is clear: they are Chinese and Russian exports. Sales by these two countries are now fueling the spread of chemical weapons, nuclear weapons and long-range missiles in a number of countries, some of which support...

Pages